BYU

BYU vs Connecticut Statistical Analysis

A statistical breakdown of BYU’s game against Connecticut

BYU Offense:

Called Plays: 95

Called Passes: 56 (53 pass, 2 sack, 1 spike)

Called Runs: 39

Number of Read Options (kept/given/pass): 22 (1/21/0)

BYU ran the read option quite a bit, over half of their called runs were read option plays. Tanner actually made some progression in his confidence to carry the ball, this was the first time that he has kept the ball on the read option, even though the play ended up being a loss it was good to see Tanner gain some confidence in his reads and attempt to make a play on his own when he felt that it was available. There was one major miscue on the read option between Bernard and Mangum where the ball was fumbled and resulted in a turnover while BYU was marching down the field early in the game which completely swung the momentum out of their favor.

1st:

Give (Bernard, -1), Give (Bernard, Fumbled), Give (Brown, 0)

2nd:

Give (Brown, 1), Give (Carter, 1), Give (Carter, 2), Give (Brown, 10), Give (Brown, 9)

3rd:

Give (Brown, 3), Give (Brown, 6), Give (Brown, 3), Give (Carter, 2), Give (Brown, 0), Give (Brown, 6)

4th:

Give (Carter, 1), Keep (-2), Give (Bernard, 10), Give (Bernard, 1), Give (Bernard, 2), Give (Bernard, 15), Give (Carter, 1), Give (Bernard, 1)

Time Mangum had in pocket on passes:

1st Q: 41.5/12 = 3.46 seconds

2nd Q: 75.5/19 = 3.97 seconds

3rd Q: 51.8/14 = 3.7 seconds

4th Q: 29.8/8 = 3.73 seconds

Game: 3.75 seconds

Time Mangum had in pocket before scrambling (avg gain on scramble):

1st Q: N/A

2nd Q: 8.1/2 = 4.05 seconds (-7 yds)

3rd Q: N/A

4th Q: N/A

Game: 4.05 seconds (-3.5 yds)

How many man rush on scrambles:

1st Q: N/A

2nd Q: 8/2 = 4 man rush

3rd Q: N/A

4th Q: N/A

Offensive Stats:

1st Q:

Tanner Mangum: 11/12 for 119 yds; Algernon Brown: 5 rushes for 11 yds; Riley Burt: 1 rush for 5 yds; Francis Bernard: 3 rushes for -1 yd, 1 TD, 1 fumble; Terenn Houk: 3 catches for 64 yds, 3 tgts; Mitch Mathews: 3 catches for 25 yds, 3 tgts; Nick Kurtz: 1 catch for 9 yds, 2 tgts; Nate Carter: 1 catch for 7 yds, 1 tgt; Mitch Juergens: 1 catch for 5 yds, 1 tgt; Devon Blackmon: 1 catch for 4 yds, 1 tgt;

2nd Q:

Tanner Mangum: 12/19 for 120 yds, 1 INT, 2 rushes for -7 yds; Algernon Brown: 5 rushes for 30 yds, 1 catch for 6 yds, 1 tgt; Nate Carter: 3 rushes for 6 yds; Mitch Juergens: 5 catches for 51 yds, 6 tgts; Terenn Houk: 2 catches for 41 yds, 2 tgts; Nick Kurtz: 2 catches for 12 yds, 2 tgts; Devon Blackmon: 2 catches for 11 yds, 1 drop, 3 tgts; Moroni Laulu-Pututau: 1 drop, 1 tgt; Mitch Mathews: 1 INT, 3 tgts;

3rd Q:

Tanner Mangum: 8/14 for 94 yds, 2 rushes for -18 yds, 1 INT; Algernon Brown: 8 rushes for 54 yds; Nate Carter: 2 rushes for 4 yds; Francis Bernard1 rush for 3 yds; Mitch Juergens: 3 catches for 17 yds, 3 tgts; Nick Kurtz: 2 catches for 30 yds, 1 drop, 3 tgts; Mitch Mathews: 2 catches for 22 yds, 1 INT, 1 drop, 4 tgts; Terenn Houk: 1 catch for 24 yds, 2 tgts; Devon Blackmon: 1 tgt;

4th Q:

 Tanner Mangum: 4/8 for 32 yds, 2 TDs, 1 rush for -2 yds; Francis Bernard: 6 rushes for 67 yds; Nate Carter: 3 rushes for 4 yds; Mitch Mathews: 3 catches for 31 yds, 2 TDs, 1 drop, 5 tgts; Mitch Juergens: 1 catch for 1 yd, 2 tgts; Nick Kurtz: 1 drop, 1 tgt;

Between the 30’s BYU’s offense was elite. Their performance in the blue zone however, struggled. BYU had 12 drives on the night, 6 ended in scores, 2 in missed FGs, 1 punt, and 3 TO’s (2 INTs, 1 F). Everything looked great between the 30’s, BYU was able to move the ball at will and set the tone early, but failed to capitalize. This was the first game this season that the offense lost the turnover battle and that will need to change in order to beat ECU this week.

Tanner shook off his poor play against Michigan and was on fire to start the game against UConn. He was able to take advantage of their zone coverage and pick them apart starting the 1st Q 11/12 for 119 yds and even finished the half 23/31 for 239 yds. He did a great job in avoiding pressure (only being sacked twice, one he ran right into) and threw the ball away when he needed to. He made some fantastic throws over the middle of the field and looks like he’s beginning to really understand the playbook where everything is coming second nature. Mangum wasn’t perfect, there were two balls where he had a receiver in the EZ and under threw it but he also made some great throws over the middle to Houk and a great throw on a comeback route to Blackmon. He was able to take a lot from his performance against Michigan and apply it to the game against Connecticut and will continue to improve going forward.

The rush attack got off to a slow start against UConn, but what can be expected when injuries knock the depth down to the RBs who were slated to be 3rd, 4th and 5th before fall camp. At halftime, they only had 44 yds and 41 of those came from Algernon Brown. As the game wore on, they were able to establish the run and gained 130 yds on 22 carries in the 2nd half. Algernon Brown did a great job running the ball and Francis Bernard added even more physicality to the run game, running tough between the tackles and reading his blockers. While Hine remains out, the reps should be split evenly between Bernard and Brown, especially now that Bernard will be getting his cast off this week and will be able to control the ball better.

BYU’s receiving core received a challenge from their coach and they stepped up. Connecticut exclusively played zone defense against BYU’s WRs and they were able to take advantage of the match ups. Terenn Houk and Mitch Juergens were stand outs, Houk had two great catches over the middle in traffic where he elevated over the defenders and was also able to get some YAC as well. Juegens led the team in catches with 10 and played tough even after leaving the game with a sprained shoulder. Mitch Mathews led the team in receiving TDs (2) but didn’t really do much until late in the game.

BYU’s OL did a great job stepping up after last weeks debacle. Tejan was able to dominate the opposing NT and Ryker Mathews played great, as usual. There were some lapses by Ului as he played LG, but nothing major. The OL did a great job protecting Mangum only giving up two sacks, there were some struggles in the run game which came from a lack of depth in the backfield. As the game progressed, BYU was able to wear down UConn’s defense and run all over them which is what a team needs in order to put the nail in the coffin late in the game.

After the Michigan game, this performance was a step in the right direction as they continue into their October schedule. BYU will need to continue to improve and tidy up their execution as they get ready for ECU.

BYU Defense:

Defensive Stats:

Sae Tautu: 6 tackles (6-0) 1 sack, 3 TFL

Teu Kautai: 5 tackles (5-0)

Michael Shelton: 4 tackles (3-1), 1 INT

Fred Warner: 3 tackles (3-0)

Bronson Kaufusi: 3 tackles (3-0), 1 sack, 2 TFL, 1 INT

Micah Hannemann: 3 tackles (3-0)

Manoa Pikula: 2 tackles (2-0), 1 sack, 1 TFL

Michael Wadsworth: 2 tackles (1-1), 2 PBU

Sione Takitaki: 1 tackle (1-0), 1 sack, 1 TFL

 

Most Targeted Player:

Mike Davis: 3/5

complete zone, incomplete, incomplete, complete zone, complete zone

Micah Hannemann: 0/4

incomplete, incomplete, incomplete zone, incomplete

Teu Kautai: 1/3

complete zone, incomplete zone, incomplete zone

Michael Wadsworth: 0/2, 2 PBU

PBU, PBU

Kai Nacua: 2/2

complete zone, complete zone

Sae Tautu: 2/2, TD

complete zone, complete zone (TD)

Michael Shelton: 1/2, INT

complete, INT

Bronson Kaufusi: 0/1, INT

INT

Swing/Screen/Dump Pass: 4/5

screen (1/2), swing (4/5), flat (1/1)

Thrown Away Passes: 1

BYU’s defense had a great showing against Connecticut, only allowing 230 yds on 55 plays and also only allowed only two drives of longer than 25 yds, both resulted in scores for UConn, (80 yd TD drive, 55 yd FG). They played a great game overall and continued their 4th Q dominance only giving up a FG and are currently are +39 in the 4th Q outscoring opponents 56-17. This kind of performance late in the game does a lot for the confidence of a team and allows them to put their opponent away late in the game.

BYU was able to hold UConn to only 62 yds on the ground with a long play of 26 yds which was a result of a DB losing outside leverage. Bryant Shirreffs was a legitimate running threat and BYU was able to hold him for -5 yds and allowed a long of 8 yds, a big time improvement from allowing non-mobile QB Jake Rudock to run for two scores against them the week prior. Bronson Kaufusi and Sae Tautu both had outstanding games and were able to create disruption in the backfield to keep Shirreffs on his heels. Tomasi Laulile also looked good on the DL while Sione Takitaki had an effect in the game until he was ejected early in the game. BYU will have a difficult test this week against ECU in containing their mobile QB Summers and will need to build on this performance going forward.

BYU’s secondary is really shaping up, and is seeing weekly improvements and the 5 primary players only allowed 6/15 completions with Hannemann and Davis combining for 3/9. Davis has been one of the most overlooked players on the team this year because of his lockdown pass D while Micah Hannemann has been among the team’s most improved players. He played great defenes against his receivers and has done a better job getting a feel for the receiver and is more fluid in covering routes. BYU will face two QBs against ECU next week in Kemp and Summers. Kemp is a passing QB who will lean more on his arm and completes nearly 70% of his passes.

BYU played much more disciplined this week which was a resulted of a more simplified game plan, according to Bronco Mendenhall. They were able to execute and make plays when they needed, but there was a noticeable lack of energy which Coach Poppinga brought up. BYU will face a much tougher opponent in ECU and will need to have an energetic leader out on the field to lead the team.


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